English version

squat

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishsquatsquat1 /skɒwt $ skwɑːt/ ●○○ verb (squatted, squatting) [intransitive]  1 squat.jpg SITto sit with your knees bent under you and your bottom just off the ground, balancing on your feetsquat down He squatted down beside the little girl.see thesaurus at sit2 LIVE SOMEWHEREto live in a building or on a piece of land without permission and without paying rent→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
squatPeople squatted around the fire in small groupsA little boy was squatting at the edge of the pool.He squatted down beside me and offered me a cigarette.Tuan Ti Fo squatted, his legs folded under him, watching the boy.Thousands of families are still squatting in war-damaged buildings.It squatted incongruously among the trees, looking like a visitor from another planet.Blue Mooney squatted next to a pink-and-white Pontiac as he stabbed the ice pick into the fourth tire.Finally he broke away and went and squatted on his haunches by the stream.The trail was half lost in fog, the overcast squatted on the mountain.
squatsquat2 adjective  LOWSHORT PERSONshort and thick or low and wide, especially in a way which is not attractive squat stone cottages a squat little old man
Examples from the Corpus
squatThe brown buildings were old and squat.Comanche tipis were more squat and conical.a shabby, squat, balding man in an old raincoatRavi-no stood looking, his squat body immensely still.And now this desperate damage: the squat compactness unhinged, made powerless.The floor was covered in thick creamy carpet on which stood squat, natural leather chairs.During the greater part of each contest, the two are settled in a squat position, measuring each other.He came at last to Kinton, rounded the squat, square-towered church and the main street of the village stretched before him.The cook was short and squat, with thick eyebrows and a slight moustache.
squatsquat3 noun  1 SIT[countable] a squatting position2 [countable] British EnglishLIVE SOMEWHERE a house that people are living in without permission and without paying rent She lives in a squat in Camden.3 [uncountable] American English informal nothing, or nearly nothing. Squat is often used in negative sentences for emphasis He had a job that paid him squat. You don’t know squat about it.
Examples from the Corpus
squatHe was in that terrible state of lumbar pain where mobility involves a slow ambulatory squat.Most of them have moved off since they broke the squat.The rubber band workout group improved 26 percent in the squat and 17 percent in the shoulder press.
From Longman Business Dictionarysquatsquat1 /skɒwtskwɑːt/ verb (squatted, squatting) [intransitive]PROPERTY to live in a building or on a piece of land without permission and without paying rentThere are people squatting in the house next door.→ See Verb tablesquatsquat2 noun [singular] British EnglishPROPERTY a house that people are living in without permission and without paying rent
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Verb table
squat
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theysquat
he, she, itsquats
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theysquatted
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave squatted
he, she, ithas squatted
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad squatted
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill squat
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have squatted
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam squatting
he, she, itis squatting
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you, we, theyare squatting
Past
I, he, she, itwas squatting
you, we, theywere squatting
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been squatting
he, she, ithas been squatting
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been squatting
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be squatting
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been squatting
> View Less