English version

stagger

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Sport
staggerstag‧ger1 /ˈstæɡə $ -ər/ ●●○ verb 🔊 🔊 1 [intransitive always + adverb/preposition]WALK to walk or move unsteadily, almost falling over syn stumble 🔊 He managed to stagger home. 🔊 She staggered back a step. 🔊 The old man staggered drunkenly to his feet.see thesaurus at walk2 SHOCK[transitive] to make someone feel very surprised or shocked syn amaze 🔊 What staggered us was the sheer size of her salary.3 [intransitive] (also stagger on)DS to continue doing something when you seem to be going to fail and you do not know what will happen 🔊 He staggered on for another two years.stagger from something to something 🔊 The company staggered from one crisis to the next.4 [transitive]SPREAD to arrange people’s working hours, holidays etc so that they do not all begin and end at the same time 🔊 Jim and his wife stagger their work hours so one of them can be at home with the kids.5 [transitive] to start a race with each runner at a different place on a curved track
→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
staggerSomething hit me on the head, and I staggered across the room.I staggered across to the washbasins.Cardiff staggered and almost fell back against Barbara.We were all staggered by the news of her death.My father was staggering under the weight of a huge parcel.stagger from something to somethingThe company might stagger from crisis to crisis.The economy continued to stagger from crisis to crisis.
staggerstagger2 noun [countable usually singular] 🔊 🔊 WALKan unsteady movement of someone who is having difficulty in walking
Examples from the Corpus
staggerAt Twentieth and Larimer he saw some men with a stagger in their gait.But leaving no trace on the breath, never impairing speech or inducing a slight stagger, faro had escaped her view.What is not readily appreciated by the newcomer is the stagger of the line lengths.At a slightly uneven stagger the coffin set off down the aisle.
From Longman Business Dictionarystaggerstag‧ger /ˈstægə-ər/ verb [transitive]1HUMAN RESOURCESto arrange people’s working hours, holidays etc so that they do not all begin and end at the same timeThe meetings are staggered throughout the day to give shift workers the opportunity to attend.More could be done to encourage staggered working hours.2FINANCEto arrange a series of payments, deliveries etc so that they do not all happen at the same timeThe loan repayments were staggered over a long period.The remaining aircraft will be delivered on a staggered basis by the year 2025.→ See Verb table
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Verb table
stagger
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theystagger
he, she, itstaggers
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theystaggered
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave staggered
he, she, ithas staggered
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad staggered
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill stagger
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have staggered
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam staggering
he, she, itis staggering
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you, we, theyare staggering
Past
I, he, she, itwas staggering
you, we, theywere staggering
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been staggering
he, she, ithas been staggering
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been staggering
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be staggering
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been staggering
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