Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1500-1600
Origin: stacker 'to stagger' (13-19 centuries), from Old Norse stakra, from staka 'to push'

stagger

1 verb
     
Related topics: Sport
stag‧ger1
1 [intransitive always + adverb/preposition] to walk or move unsteadily, almost falling over [= stumble]:
He managed to stagger home.
She staggered back a step.
The old man staggered drunkenly to his feet.
2 [transitive] to make someone feel very surprised or shocked [= amaze]:
What staggered us was the sheer size of her salary.
3 [intransitive] also stagger onDS to continue doing something when you seem to be going to fail and you do not know what will happen:
He staggered on for another two years.
stagger from something to something
The company staggered from one crisis to the next.
4 [transitive] to arrange people's working hours, holidays etc so that they do not all begin and end at the same time:
Jim and his wife stagger their work hours so one of them can be at home with the kids.
5 [transitive] to start a race with each runner at a different place on a curved track
WORD FOCUS: walk WORD FOCUS: walk
stroll in a relaxed way for pleasure
wander
with no aim or direction
stride
in a confident or angry way
march
soldiers
hike
for long distances in the countryside or the mountains
tiptoe
very quietly
wade
through water
stagger
in an unsteady way because you are drunk or injured
limp
with difficulty because one leg is painful or injured
walk

See also
walk

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