English version

start up

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishstart up phrasal verb1 if you start up a business, company etc, or it starts up, it begins to exist Tax breaks help new companies start up.start something ↔ up Jordan started up a band of his own.2 if an engine, car etc starts up, or you start it up, it begins working The driver got back into the car and started up.start something ↔ up Rory started up the engine and got the vehicle moving.3 if a sound, activity, or event starts up, it begins to exist or happen The crickets had started up now that it was evening. start→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
start upThe anti-virus icon should appear whenever you start up your computer.
start-upˈstart-up1 adjective [only before noun]  START DOING somethingconnected with starting a new business start-up costs
Examples from the Corpus
start-upa start-up budget of $90,000The time has come for start-up companies like mine to turn all our efforts into something concrete.start-up companiesWith savings of £20,000 you could expect to finance a franchise with a start-up cost and working capital of £60,000.See what the normal start-up costs are for renting and furnishing an office, a salesroom, or a studio.It provides start-up dialogues, macro dialogues and exit dialogues to open and close applications.The company, called VacTex Corp., has raised $ 1 million in start-up funds.Several start-up Net companies saw their share prices rocket in the first few years, only to see them plunge as the recession hit.But to take ViaCord beyond the start-up phase, Fisher this year plans to seek $ 6 million in venture capital.Kenyon wound up shaving not one but three seconds off the start-up time, sparing a hundred extra souls from the Reaper.
Related topics: Computers
start-upstart-up2 noun [countable]  a new small company or business, especially one whose work involves computers or the Internet an Internet start-up
Examples from the Corpus
start-upThere were 4000 start-ups in Silicon Valley in 1998.Typical of such an arrangement is the funding provided by Compaq Computers to a start-up in 1986.Former rally driver Jean Denton is battling to reduce red tape and bureaucratic burdens on small firms and start-ups.Compared with the rest of the country, California now has above-average growth in jobs, exports and business start-ups.Those transient troubles occurred on especially cold mornings at initial start-up.Internet start-upsNew start-ups provided 14 percent, and new branches 18 percent.It is not necessary to be a small start-up.I was peripherally involved in a somewhat obstructionist way in the start-up of C-SPAN.Details of the USWeb plan were not available, but sources say the start-up will offer prospective franchisees a turnkey operation.
From Longman Business Dictionarystart-upˈstart-up adjective start-up costs, spending etc are connected with beginning and running a new business or new business activitya start-up budget of £90,000The company saw its profits drop because of the effect of start-up costs at a new plastics molding plant.
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Verb table
start
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theystart
he, she, itstarts
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theystarted
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave started
he, she, ithas started
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad started
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill start
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have started
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam starting
he, she, itis starting
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you, we, theyare starting
Past
I, he, she, itwas starting
you, we, theywere starting
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been starting
he, she, ithas been starting
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been starting
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be starting
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been starting
> View Less