Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1600-1700
Language: Dutch
Origin: stoken

stoke

verb
     
stoke also stoke up [transitive]
1 to add more coal or wood to a fire:
I stoked the furnace for the night.
2 to cause something to increase:
Rising oil prices stoked inflation.
stoke fear/anger/envy etc
The scandal has stoked public outrage.

stoke up

phrasal verb
1

stoke something ↔ up

to add more coal or wood to a fire:
We kept the fire stoked up high on cold nights.
2

stoke up something

if something stokes up fear, anger etc, it makes a lot of people feel frightened etc:
The leaflets stoked up fears of an invasion.
3

stoke up on/with something

to eat a lot of food, for example because you will not eat again for a long time:
We stoked up on hot soup before going out in the snow.

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