Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Language: Old English
Origin: stoppian 'to block up'

stop

1 verb
     
stop1 S1 W1 past tense and past participle stopped, present participle stopping
1

not move

[intransitive and transitive] to not walk, move, or travel any more, or to make someone or something do this
He stopped suddenly when he saw Ruth.
Stop, come back!
He stopped the car and got out.
I was worried that the security guards would stop us at the gate.
stop at/outside/in etc
She stopped outside the post office.
A car stopped behind us.
stop to do something
Sam stopped to give me a lift.
stop and do something
He stopped and looked into her face.
stop for
I need to stop for a rest.
stop dead/short/in your tracks (=stop walking suddenly)
Sally saw the ambulance and stopped short.
stop on a dime American English (=stop very quickly - used about cars)
This truck can stop on a dime!
2

not continue

a) [intransitive and transitive] to not continue, or to make someone or something not continue:
By midday the rain had stopped.
This is where the path stops.
The referee stopped the fight.
The doctor advised me to stop the medication.
People are fighting to stop the destruction of the rainforests.
stop somebody doing something
I couldn't stop her crying.
b) [intransitive and transitive] if you stop doing something, you do not continue to do it
stop doing something
I stopped digging and looked at him.
What time do you stop work?
I've been smoking for over ten years, and I can't stop.
stop it/that (=stop doing something annoying)
Come on, you two, stop it!
Right, stop what you're doing and come over here.
3

pause

[intransitive] to pause in an activity, journey etc in order to do something before you continue
stop for
We stopped for a drink on the way home.
stop to do something
I stopped to tie my shoe.
stop to think/consider etc
It's time we stopped to think about our next move.
4

prevent

[transitive] to prevent someone from doing something or something from happening:
The government tried to stop publication of the book.
I'm leaving now, and you can't stop me.
stop somebody/something (from) doing something
Lay the carpet on paper to stop it sticking to the floor.
The rain didn't stop us from enjoying the trip.
stop yourself (from) doing something
I couldn't stop myself laughing.
She grabbed the rail to stop herself from falling.
there's nothing to stop somebody (from) doing something
There's nothing to stop you applying for the job yourself.
5

stay

[intransitive] British English informal to stay somewhere for a short time, especially at someone's house:
I won't sit down - I'm not stopping.
stop for
Will you stop for a cup of tea?
6

will/would stop at nothing (to do something)

to be ready to do anything to achieve something that you want to achieve:
We will stop at nothing to save our child.
7

stop short of (doing) something

to decide that you are not willing to do something wrong or dangerous, though you will do something similar that is less dangerous:
The US government supported sanctions but stopped short of military action.
8

money

[transitive] if you stop an amount of money, you prevent it from being paid to someone:
Dad threatened to stop my pocket money.
stop something from something
£200 will be stopped from your wages next month to pay for the damage.
I phoned the bank and asked them to stop the cheque (=not pay a cheque that I had written).
My mother called the bank to stop payment on the check.
9

block

also stop up [transitive] to block a hole or pipe so that water, smoke etc cannot go through it

stop back

phrasal verb
to go back to a place you have been to earlier:
Can you stop back later? I'm busy right now.

stop by (something)

phrasal verb
to make a short visit to a place or person, especially while you are going somewhere else:
I'll stop by this evening.
Daniel stopped by the store on his way home.

stop in

phrasal verb
1 to make a short visit to a place or person, especially while you are going somewhere else:
I'll stop in and see you on my way home.
stop in at
I need to stop in at the library.
2 British English to stay at home:
I'm stopping in to wash my hair tonight.

stop off

phrasal verb
to make a short visit to a place during a journey, especially to rest or to see someone:
We can stop off and see you on our way back.
stop off in/at etc
We stopped off in Santa Rosa for a day.

stop out

phrasal verb
informal to stay out later than usual:
It was a real treat being allowed to stop out late.

stop over

phrasal verb
to stop somewhere and stay a short time before continuing a long journey, especially when travelling by plane:
The plane stops over in Dubai on the way to India.
stopover

stop up

phrasal verb
1

stop sth↔ up

to block a hole or pipe so that water, smoke etc cannot go through it
2 British English informal to stay up late:
Joe stopped up till 3 o'clock to watch the boxing.
GRAMMAR GRAMMAR

To stop doing something means to not continue an activity It has stopped raining (NOT stopped from raining). He couldn't stop talking about it (NOT stop from talking/stop to talk). To stop to do something means to stand still, or stop what you are doing, in order to do something He stopped to pick up a piece of paper. To stop someone from doing something means to prevent someone from doing something You can't stop me from going (NOT stop me to go). In British English you can leave out 'from' This will help stop people dying of AIDS.

Dictionary pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
What is the word for picture 1? What is the word for picture 2? What is the word for picture 3? What is the word for picture 4?
Click on any of the pictures above to find out what it is called.

Explore our topic dictionary