English version

stoppage

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishstoppagestop‧page /ˈstɒpɪdʒ $ ˈstɑːp-/ noun  1 [countable]STOP WORKING/GO ON STRIKE a situation in which workers stop working for a short time as a protest time lost in disputes and stoppages a work stoppage by government employees2 [countable, uncountable] especially British EnglishSTOP MOVINGSTOP something THAT IS HAPPENING when something stops moving or happening We had five minutes of stoppage time (=extra time played in a sports match because of pauses) at the end of the first half.3 [countable]PREVENT something that blocks a tube or container an intestinal stoppage
Examples from the Corpus
stoppageIt all revolves around who get the put-in to the scrummage following a stoppage at ruck or maul.Was he attempting to force them to a stoppage in the hopes of taking over their lease?a stoppage of welfare paymentsCustoms officers will return to work today after a twenty-four hour stoppage.Ole Gunnar Solskjaer accepted a return ball from Dwight Yorke to complete the scoring in stoppage time.At the moment there's too much whistle and so too many stoppages.In the aftermath of both these outbursts of militancy stoppages of work declined dramatically.Ferguson raged at the fourth official when he indicated four minutes of stoppage time, insisting that it should have been 14.The unions said that they were looking for the second week in January to begin an all-out stoppage.The plumber cleared the stoppage in the building's sewer line.Railworkers in central Poland also joined the stoppage, cutting the link with the industrial south-west.The stoppage is being organised by factory committees.a one-day work stoppageThe plan is likely to be met with work stoppages and other labor disruptions.work stoppageEach time the game has endured a work stoppage.Why invest allegiance in a sport that in seven months is expected to embark on another work stoppage?He has nothing left to hurl at Rick Adelman by way of insult or work stoppage.Sometimes the rejection and rebellion was expressed in a major way through strikes, work stoppages, and slowdowns.stoppage timeBut deep into first-half stoppage time, O'Leary's outstretched leg caught Yorke in full flight.Ole Gunnar Solskjaer accepted a return ball from Dwight Yorke to complete the scoring in stoppage time.Sylvain Wiltord pilfered a third goal deep into stoppage time after being teed up by Patrick Vieira.Ferguson raged at the fourth official when he indicated four minutes of stoppage time, insisting that it should have been 14.
From Longman Business Dictionarystoppagestop‧page /ˈstɒpɪdʒˈstɑːp-/ noun1[countable] a situation in which workers stop working for a short time as a protestThe stoppage was called (=organized) to protest against the cancellation of wage agreements.2[countable, uncountable] the act of stopping something from moving or happeningcomplete stoppages of production3stoppages [plural] British EnglishACCOUNTINGTAXFINANCE money from your wages that your employer keeps in order to pay your tax, for your PENSION etc SYN DEDUCTIONSI earn £200 a week before stoppages.
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