English version

strident

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishstridentstri‧dent /ˈstraɪdənt/ adjective  1 DETERMINEDforceful and determined, especially in a way that is offensive or annoying strident criticism2 SOUNDLOUD/NOISYa strident sound or voice is loud and unpleasant the strident calls of seagullsstridently adverbstridency noun [uncountable]
Examples from the Corpus
stridentOne may hope that this forceful advocacy can remain in most instances persuasive and considered rather than strident.Instead, they will be replaced with a magazine with a less strident and more caring title-Dialog.There was much humour, of a strident, bitter sort.Middle-class moralists might be ardent, even strident, but working-class patterns continued to be remarkably resistant and independent.strident criticsthe strident demands of the American mediaBut the older Matthew Arnold has little with which to correct the strident exaggeration of youth.In reality, taking ownership of benefits and breakthroughs is pitched at a lower and less strident key.
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