Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1200-1300
Language: Old French
Origin: somondre, from Latin summonere 'to remind secretly', from sub- 'secretly' + monere 'to warn'

summon

verb
     
sum‧mon [transitive] formal
1 to order someone to come to a place:
Robert summoned the waiter for the bill.
summon somebody to something
The president summoned Taylor to Washington.
summon somebody to do something
He was summoned to attend an emergency meeting.
2 to officially order someone to come to a court of law:
Hugh was summoned to appear before the magistrate.
3 also summon something up to try very hard to have enough of something such as courage, energy, or strength, because you need it:
He had to summon the energy to finish the race.
4

summon a meeting/conference etc

to arrange for a meeting to take place and order people to come to it [= convene]:
He summoned a meeting of business leaders.

summon up something

phrasal verb
1 if something summons up a memory, thought, or image, it makes you remember it or think of it [= conjure up]:
The smell summoned up memories of family holidays by the sea.
2 to try very hard to have enough courage, energy, or strength, because you need it:
Ruth took a deep breath, summoned up her courage, and told him the truth.

Dictionary pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
What is the word for picture 1? What is the word for picture 2? What is the word for picture 3? What is the word for picture 4?
Click on any of the pictures above to find out what it is called.

Explore our topic dictionary