Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1200-1300
Language: Old French
Origin: suspendre 'to hang up, interrupt', from Latin suspendere, from sub- 'up' + pendere 'to hang'

suspend

verb
     
sus‧pend [transitive]
1

stop

to officially stop something from continuing, especially for a short time:
Sales of the drug will be suspended until more tests are completed.
Talks between the two countries have now been suspended.
2

leave a job/school

to make someone leave their school or job for a short time, especially because they have broken the rules:
The two police officers have been suspended until an enquiry is carried out.
suspend somebody from something
Dave was suspended from school for a week.
3

hang

formal to attach something to a high place so that it hangs down
suspend something from something
A large light was suspended from the ceiling.
suspend something by something
He was suspended by his feet and beaten with metal bars.
4

suspend judgment

to decide not to make a firm decision or judgment about something until you know more about it
5

suspend disbelief

to try to believe that something is true, for example when you are watching a film or play
6

be suspended in something

technical if something is suspended in a liquid or in air, it floats in it without moving

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