English version

take somebody/something ↔ in

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishtake somebody/something ↔ in phrasal verb1 be taken inTRICK/DECEIVE to be completely deceived by someone who lies to you Don’t be taken in by products claiming to help you lose weight in a week.2 take somebody ↔ inSTAY WITH SB, IN A HOTEL ETC to let someone stay in your house because they have nowhere else to stay Brett’s always taking in stray animals.3 take something ↔ inUNDERSTAND to understand and remember new facts and information syn absorb He watches the older kids, just taking it all in. His eyes quickly took in the elegance of her dress.4 take something ↔ in American English to collect or earn a particular amount of money syn take British English5 to visit a place while you are in the area They continued a few miles further to take in Hinton House.6 American English old-fashionedGO TO/ATTEND if you take in a show, play etc, you go to see it7 take somebody ↔ in British English old-fashioned if the police take someone in, they take them to a police station to ask them questions about a crime All five teenagers were arrested and taken in for questioning.8 DC take something ↔ in to make a piece of clothing fit you by making it narrower opp let out take→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
be taken inHe seemed so confident, that I was completely taken in.He told me that it was a genuine diamond, and I was completely taken in.Radiographs of the women's lateral thoracic and lumbar spine were taken in a standardised manner.Phonemes, bits and pieces of the language spoken to and around him, are taken in along with other images.Students were to be taken in as boarders, having been recommended by a respectable person who knew them or their families.Don't be taken in by products claiming to make you lose weight quickly.We were all taken in by the scheme and invested far more money than we should have.Thirdly, new land can be taken in, cleared and farmed, and new settlements created.We had a tumbleweed like that in Arizona for a Christmas tree, but this photograph was taken in Colorado.Thus he may decide that although the investigation discloses a criminal offence, no action should be taken in the criminal courts.taken in for questioningThey were taken in for questioning after being arrested at houses in and around the southwestern town of Bayonne.The parents of one family weren't taken in for questioning at all that day, but Mrs W was.
From Longman Business Dictionarytake something → in phrasal verb [transitive]COMMERCE if a price or cost takes something in, it includes itThis price takes in the cost of all accommodation and food. take→ See Verb table
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Verb table
take
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theytake
he, she, ittakes
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theytook
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave taken
he, she, ithas taken
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad taken
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill take
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have taken
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam taking
he, she, itis taking
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you, we, theyare taking
Past
I, he, she, itwas taking
you, we, theywere taking
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been taking
he, she, ithas been taking
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been taking
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be taking
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been taking
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