English version

take somebody/something ↔ out

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishtake somebody/something ↔ out phrasal verb1 INVITE take somebody ↔ out to take someone as your guest to a restaurant, cinema, club etctake somebody ↔ out for We’re taking my folks out for a meal next week.2 take something ↔ outGET to make a financial or legal arrangement with a bank, company, law court etctake out a policy/injunction/loan etc Before taking a loan out, calculate your monthly outgoings.3 take something ↔ out to get money from your bank account syn withdraw How much would you like to take out?4 take something ↔ out to borrow books from a library You can take out six books at a time.5 take somebody/something ↔ out informalDESTROYKILL to kill someone or destroy something The building was taken out by a bomb. take→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
take forLily had nothing to do but wait for Stephen, and see if he would take her out for a drive again.Only rarely have I even taken it out for a hot sync or a rendezvous to beam with its pals.One day this son of a landowner was about to take his boat out for a leisurely day of fishing.Her Uncle Tom is delighted and arranges to take her out for a slap up meal.David and I were wondering if we could take you out for a spot of lunch.Their devotion was apparent when we took them both out for a walk.The Harrison brothers took H-I out for trial runs on a barge on the River Humber.take out a policy/injunction/loan etcBut many borrowers choose an appealing discount deal as the sole criterion when they take out a loan.I know of a fellow of over sixty who took out a policy.The majority of students have not felt obliged to take out loans as they have not thought it necessary.Mr Belcher, 64, and his 63-year-old wife took out a loan for their dream of becoming their own bosses.Most mortgage experts advise against taking out a loan in one currency, if your main income is in a different currency.Jaguar had taken out an injunction last week to prevent McLaren from employing Newey when his contract expires in 2002.Even the most wealthy moguls and healthy corporations will take out loans or mortgages to finance homes and equipment.They had to take out a loan to pay their last fuel bill.
From Longman Business Dictionarytake something → out phrasal verb [transitive] to arrange to get something officially, especially from an insurance company or a court of lawI’m thinking of taking out a life insurance policy.If discounting took place without the publishers’ permission, they would take out an injunction (=ask a court of law to give an order) to prevent it. take→ See Verb tabletake-outˈtake-out noun [countable]FINANCE when investors who provided the capital to start a new business sell shares in the business once it has become successful
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Verb table
take
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theytake
he, she, ittakes
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theytook
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave taken
he, she, ithas taken
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad taken
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill take
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have taken
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam taking
he, she, itis taking
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you, we, theyare taking
Past
I, he, she, itwas taking
you, we, theywere taking
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been taking
he, she, ithas been taking
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been taking
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be taking
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been taking
> View Less