Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1600-1700
Language: Medieval Latin
Origin: tendentia, from Latin tendere; TEND

tendency

noun
     
Related topics: Groupings
ten‧den‧cy S3 W3 plural tendencies [countable]
1 if someone or something has a tendency to do or become a particular thing, they are likely to do or become it
a tendency to do something
Greg's tendency to be critical made him unpopular with his co-workers.
The drug is effective but has a tendency to cause headaches.
tendency to/towards
Some people may inherit a tendency to alcoholism.
tendency for
Researchers believe that the tendency for diabetes is present at birth.
2 a general change or development in a particular direction
there is a tendency (for somebody) to do something
There is an increasing tendency for women to have children later in life.
tendency to/towards
a general tendency towards conservation and recycling
tendency among
a tendency among Americans to get married at a later age
3

aggressive/suicidal/criminal/artistic etc tendencies

a part of someone's character that makes them likely to behave in a certain way or become an artist, criminal etc:
children with aggressive or anti-social tendencies
4 [also + plural verb British English]PPG a group within a larger political group that supports ideas that are usually more extreme than those of the main group:
the growing fascist tendency

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