Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1300-1400
Origin: Perhaps from a Scandinavian language

tilt

1 verb
     
tilt1 [intransitive and transitive]
1 to move a part of your body, especially your head or chin, upwards or to the side [= tip]:
My mother tilted her head and smiled.
Ned's mouth tilted upwards slightly at the corners.
2 to move or make something move into a position where one side is higher than the other [= tip]:
As it came into land, the plane tilted sideways.
The man was tilting his chair back.
3 if an opinion or situation tilts, or if something tilts it, it changes so that people start to prefer one person, belief, or action to others:
Crisis situations tend to tilt the balance of power in favour of the president.
tilt toward/towards
Government tax policy has tilted toward industrial development.

tilt at somebody/something

phrasal verb
1 to attack someone in what you say or write
2

tilt at windmills

to waste time and energy attacking an enemy that is not real

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