English version

toll

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Death, Roads, Textures, sounds
tolltoll1 /təʊl $ toʊl/ ●○○ noun [countable]  1 [usually singular]MXNUMBER the number of people killed or injured in a particular accident, by a particular illness etc The death toll has risen to 83. The bombings took a heavy toll, killing hundreds of Londoners.2 EFFECT/INFLUENCEa very bad effect that something has on something or someone over a long period of timetoll on Years of smoking have taken their toll on his health. a heavy toll on the environment3 TTRCOSTthe money you have to pay to use a particular road, bridge etcsee thesaurus at cost4 CSthe sound of a large bell ringing slowly
Examples from the Corpus
tollIn 1871 they built a toll bridge from the mainland to the island.Furthermore, twelve months of fencing with Malcolm McLaren had taken a toll on Branson's nerves.However, other fires burning in the state have taken a toll on efforts to fight the Lone fire.This naturally takes a toll on intellectual honesty.There were suggestions that the death toll was up to five times higher than officially stated.The death toll from the earthquake has risen still further in the worst disaster since 1952.The final toll was 83 dead and more than 100 injured.The final quarter was an untidy affair on both sides with the conditions taking a heavy toll on concentration and stamina.It was great for about an hour or so and then the effort of keeping warm began to take its toll.Balancing the dual roles of minister to the world and shepherd to his own flock has taken its toll.You have to pay tolls on many of the major roads in France.The four years had taken some physical toll.death tollBut even this ratio puts the best possible light on the contribution made by employment to the avoidable death toll.Despite these grim warnings, the end of the season saw the final death toll down a little on last year.Official Florida statistics put the death toll at six blacks and two whites killed.Many expressed disbelief that the death toll was not higher.There were suggestions that the death toll was up to five times higher than officially stated.The death toll of the plane crash has risen to 118.The death toll exceeded the 1987 Hungerford Massacre, which left 17 dead, including the gunman, Michael Ryan.The death toll is 2,276, all by fire or drowning.The death toll since 1992 is more than 18,500.taken ... tollBuilding, agriculture and dams have also taken their toll.The years had definitely taken their toll on the former glory of Fernbank.Furthermore, twelve months of fencing with Malcolm McLaren had taken a toll on Branson's nerves.A culture of isolation and relentless profit pressure had taken its toll.The four years had taken some physical toll.But in the last 40 years, the ugly little AK-47 has taken a huge toll, too.Balancing the dual roles of minister to the world and shepherd to his own flock has taken its toll.Rising unemployment has taken its inevitable toll on the consumer lending market.
Related topics: Textures, sounds
tolltoll2 verb [intransitive, transitive]  CSSOUNDif a large bell tolls, or if you toll it, it keeps ringing slowly, especially to show that someone has died
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Examples from the Corpus
tollThe funeral procession left the church as the bells began to toll.Whichever corporate lackey wins doesn't matter-the bell's already tolling.Sunday morning, the opening bell tolled for Lennox Lewis.Ask not for whom the Bell's tolls, it tolls for you.The church bell was tolling mournfully as the carriage entered the cemetery gate.Like a bell tolling, news arrived every few months of relatives and friends.Cecilia Darne, who lived round the corner, said she heard a bell toll once at about eight in the morning.
From Longman Business Dictionarytolltoll /təʊltoʊl/ noun1[countable]TRANSPORT the money you have to pay to use a particular road, bridge etcIn parts of the USA tolls are charged for motorways.Revenue is raised through customs duties and road tolls.2take a/its toll on something/somebody to have a very bad effect on something or someone over a long period of timeRising unemployment has taken its toll on the consumer lending market.
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Verb table
toll
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theytoll
he, she, ittolls
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theytolled
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave tolled
he, she, ithas tolled
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad tolled
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill toll
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have tolled
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam tolling
he, she, itis tolling
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you, we, theyare tolling
Past
I, he, she, itwas tolling
you, we, theywere tolling
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been tolling
he, she, ithas been tolling
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been tolling
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be tolling
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been tolling
> View Less