English version

trade something ↔ off

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishtrade something ↔ off phrasal verbEQUALto balance one situation or quality against another, in order to produce an acceptable result for/against Companies are under pressure to trade off price stability for short-term gains. trade-off trade→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
trade offS. authorities in hopes of a lighter sentence is a time-honored trade - off.There should be no trade - off.Second, they demonstrate how different presidential systems produce a trade - off between the principles of democratic efficiency and democratic representation.The figure is a heuristic device to illustrate this trade - off in stark terms.Schor's evidence is in direct contradiction to the neo - classical income / leisure trade - off model outlined above.Such evidence casts doubt on the validity of the income / leisure trade - off model.Institutions place third market orders with broker-dealers registered to trade exchange-listed securities off the exchange floor.
trade-offˈtrade-off noun [countable]  EQUALa balance between two opposing things, that you are willing to accept in order to achieve somethinga trade-off between something and something There has to be a trade-off between quality and quantity if we want to keep prices low.
Examples from the Corpus
trade-offInflation is often a trade-off for healthy economic growth.It is very beneficial to work for yourself, but there are trade-offs.Of course, there are technical and economic trade-offs associated with scale.You make trade-offs to stay sane.However, taking account of dignity requires the acceptance of any necessary trade-offs between it and other valued objectives.All that is certain is that trade-offs of this kind will be inevitable.Also the nature of the trade-offs may change over time, as may the choices of the policy-maker.The trade-off, as Fraser remarks, is between freedom and coherence.a trade-off between something and somethingHappily, though, most investments offer a trade-off between risk and return.Longer grams have greater storage requirements too, so there is a trade-off between performance and storage.The payment of dividends therefore represents a trade-off between agency costs and flotation costs.There is a trade-off between cost and perfection.There may be a trade-off between price maximisation and restricting the circulation of the information memorandum.These rates are clearly a trade-off between economic logic and political expediency.This implies that a trade-off between unemployment and inflation may exist only in the very short term.
From Longman Business Dictionarytrade something ↔ off phrasal verb [transitive] to balance two situations against each other in order to get an acceptable resultCompanies are under pressure to trade off price stability for short-term gains see also trade-off trade→ See Verb tabletrade-offˈtrade-off noun [countable] a balance between two situations in order to get an acceptable resultThe legal restrictions will remain as a trade-off for allowing interstate investment.
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Verb table
trade
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theytrade
he, she, ittrades
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theytraded
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave traded
he, she, ithas traded
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad traded
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill trade
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have traded
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam trading
he, she, itis trading
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you, we, theyare trading
Past
I, he, she, itwas trading
you, we, theywere trading
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been trading
he, she, ithas been trading
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been trading
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be trading
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been trading
> View Less