English version

trickle

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishldoce_111_atrickletrick‧le1 /ˈtrɪkəl/ verb [intransitive always + adverb/preposition]  1 LIQUIDif liquid trickles somewhere, it flows slowly in drops or in a thin streamtrickle down/into/out The tears trickled down her cheeks.2 FEW/NOT MANYif people, vehicles, goods etc trickle somewhere, they move there slowly in small groups or amountstrickle in/into/away The first few fans started to trickle into the stadium. trickle down trickle up→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
trickleThis leads to all sorts of bizarre behavior once the costs of misguided actions have begun to trickle down among the ranks.Tears welled behind her eyelids and trickled down her cheeks.He had a cut on his forehead and blood was trickling down his face.I sat on an upturned box, feeling the sweat beginning to trickle down my back.Blood trickled down the side of her face.The fire spread when burning gasoline trickled from the car toward other vehicles.Gary Locke estimated losses totaling billions of dollars, as damage reports of highways, homes and businesses continued to trickle in.I had heard, though, that artists are slowly beginning to trickle into the King Eddie.He trickled into the pit entry lane and stopped.Water trickled out of the pipe.trickle down/into/outHe began to sweat, a weird cold extrusion of moisture that began to trickle down his face.He ran home, blood trickling down his left cheek.When the details began to trickle out it was reluctantly conceded that perhaps two Boeing 707 shipments might have been made.Turned my face to the wall and felt hot tears trickle down my face.In spite of the rain trickling down our necks, our spirits lifted.Tears trickled down the cheeks of some stout veterans.Players will begin trickling into the marketplace by spring, with the biggest push at the Christmas season.Blood trickled down the side of her head.Responsibility trickles down to every individual; no one seems to be in charge.trickle in/into/awayA few letters did trickle in.Gary Locke estimated losses totaling billions of dollars, as damage reports of highways, homes and businesses continued to trickle in.Twenty-five years on, the claims for compensation for medical disability are still trickling in.Yet private investment, a critical test of success, is only trickling in.It sapped my strength and made sweat trickle into my eyes.I had heard, though, that artists are slowly beginning to trickle into the King Eddie.He trickled into the pit entry lane and stopped.The first few fans started to trickle into the stadium.
trickletrickle2 noun  1 LITTLE/NOT MUCHLIQUID[countable] a thin slow flow of liquid The water in the stream had been reduced to a trickle.2 LITTLE/NOT MUCH[singular] a movement of people, vehicles, goods etc into a place in very small numbers or amounts Recent legislation has reduced immigration to a trickle.trickle of a trickle of cars on the highway
Examples from the Corpus
trickleHer eyebrow had received the blow from the torch and had begun to throb; she could feel a trickle of blood.Barry was heading toward the gate, a trickle of water following him from the coiled tube on his shoulder.They kept a trickle dripping out of each faucet at night to prevent frozen pipes, but you never could tell.Fortunately there was only a trickle of water entering the opening.Only a trickle of cars was moving through Sandwich towards Royal St. George's.The raging torrent had been reduced to no more than a trickle.Ice on the roads reduced the morning rush hour traffic to a trickle.A trickle of juice ran down his chin.Productivity slowed to an erratic trickle.These cling without roots and survive on atmospheric moisture, trickles of melt-water or trapped snow and rain.She'd obviously hit her head during the impact because there was a small trickle of blood on her forehead.
From Longman Business Dictionarytrickletrick‧le /ˈtrɪkəl/ verb [intransitive] to move somewhere slowly and in very small numbers or amountsOnly four or five customers had trickled in by 11:30.Details of the programs have trickled out over the past weeks, but haven’t been widely publicized.trickle noun [singular]Trading activity slowed to a trickle as traders waited for a sign that war could be avoided. trickle down→ See Verb table
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Verb table
trickle
Simple Form
Present
ittrickles
trickle
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Past
it, theytrickled
Present perfect
theyhave trickled
ithas trickled
Past perfect
it, theyhad trickled
Future
it, theywill trickle
Future perfect
it, theywill have trickled
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Continuous Form
Present
theyare trickling
itis trickling
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Past
theywere trickling
itwas trickling
Present perfect
theyhave been trickling
ithas been trickling
Past perfect
it, theyhad been trickling
Future
it, theywill be trickling
Future perfect
it, theywill have been trickling
> View Less