English version

trip

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Drug culture
triptrip1 /trΙͺp/ ●●● S2 W2 noun πŸ”Š πŸ”Š 1 [countable]TRAVEL a visit to a place that involves a journey, for pleasure or a particular purposetrip to πŸ”Š Did you enjoy your trip to Disneyland?trip from πŸ”Š The Palace is only a short trip from here.business/school/shopping etc trip πŸ”Š a business trip to Japan πŸ”Š Two lucky employees won a round-the-world trip.coach/boat/bus trip πŸ”Š a boat trip up the Thamesday trip (=a pleasure trip done in one day) πŸ”Š It’s an 80-mile round trip (=a journey to a place and back again) to Exeter.return trip (=when you are travelling back to where you started) πŸ”Š I’m afraid you’ve had a wasted trip (=a trip in which you do not achieve your purpose), Mr Burgess has already left.go on/take a trip πŸ”Š We’re thinking of taking a trip to the mountains. πŸ”Š He was unable to make the trip to accept the award.β–Ί see thesaurus at journey2 [countable] informalMDD the strange mental experiences someone has when they take a drug such as LSD πŸ”Š a bad trip3 [singular] American English informalFUNNY a person or experience that is amusing and unusual πŸ”Š Julie’s such a trip!4 [countable] an act of falling as a result of hitting something with your foot πŸ”Š accidents caused by trips or falls β†’ ego trip, β†’ guilt trip at guilt1(4), β†’ round-trip1COLLOCATIONSverbsgo on a trip (=go somewhere and come back)I’ve been on a coach trip to France.take a trip (=go somewhere for pleasure)Take a trip on the Santa Fe railway or cruise on a Mississippi paddle boat.make a trip (=go somewhere, and perhaps come back)I couldn’t see him making the long trip to Minneapolis alone.ADJECTIVES/NOUN + trip a business tripI’m on a business trip with my boss.a shopping/fishing/skiing etc tripHe was knocked off his bicycle on his way home from a shopping trip.a school trip (=when children and teachers from a school go somewhere)She went on a school trip to Tuscany.a coach/bus/boat tripThey took a boat trip to see the seals.a day trip (=when you go somewhere for pleasure and come back the same day)Take a day trip to York, which is just 15 miles away.a round trip (=a journey to a place and back again)His wife makes a hundred and fifty mile round trip to see him twice a week.the return trip (=the journey back to a place)A day or two later she began her return trip to Chicago.a wasted trip (=a trip in which you do not achieve what you wanted to)I’m afraid you’ve had a wasted trip. We don’t have those shoes in stock.THESAURUStrip noun [countable] a visit to a place that involves a journey, done for pleasure, business, shopping etcThe trip to the coast took longer than we expected.Did you have a good trip?journey noun [countable] especially British English an occasion when you travel from one place to another, especially a long distancea long train journeyWe continued our journey on foot. They made the journey across the plains in a covered wagon.travel noun [uncountable] the general activity of travelling, especially over long distances for pleasure. Don’t confuse travel and tripa special ticket for train travel around EuropeForeign travel is becoming increasingly popular.travels noun [plural] trips to places that are far awayShe told us about her travels in South America.different types of triptour noun [countable] a trip for pleasure, during which you visit several different towns, areas etcShe’s on a three week tour of Europe.excursion noun [countable] a short trip to visit a place on holiday, usually by a group of peopleYou can go on an afternoon excursion to Catalina Island.expedition noun [countable] a long and carefully organized trip, especially to a dangerous or unfamiliar placeLewis and Clark’s expedition across North AmericaScott led an expedition to the South Pole.commute noun [countable] a trip to or from work that someone does every dayHow long is your daily commute?crossing noun [countable] a trip by boat from one piece of land to anotherThe Atlantic crossing was rough and stormy.cruise noun [countable] a trip by boat for pleasureWe went on a cruise around the Caribbean.voyage noun [countable] a very long trip in which you travel by ship or in a spacecraftColumbus set out on his voyage across the ocean.trek noun [countable] a long and difficult trip on foot, in a place far from towns and citiesThey did a trek across the Atlas Mountains.pilgrimage noun [countable] a trip to a holy place for religious reasonsShe went on a pilgrimage to Lourdes.GRAMMAR: Comparisontripβ€’ You go on a trip somewhere: We went on a trip to Morocco. βœ—Don’t say: go for a trip somewherewalkβ€’ You go for a walk somewhere: Miranda went for a long walk on the beach. driveβ€’ You go for a drive somewhere: We went for a drive in the mountains.
Examples from the Corpus
tripβ€’ They went on a trip to Australia and loved it.β€’ I was not planning a trip to Alice Springs, I pointed out.β€’ You're a trip.β€’ They decided to take a trip to Paris.β€’ We have enough money saved to take a trip to Cancun.β€’ It's such a nice day - how about going on a boat trip?β€’ My husband's away on a business trip in China.β€’ My dad and I used to go on a camping trip alone together every summer.β€’ We had a fantastic trip - the flight was fine and the hotel was perfect.β€’ Every year Peter goes on a fishing trip with all his old friends.β€’ It was the Pioneers' fourth trip to the championship game in seven years, all coming during even-numbered years.β€’ It's only a three-hour trip by plane to Seattle.β€’ I had Mrs Abadie and Mrs Jackson, whose husbands had not returned from inspection trips.β€’ My friend and I took several road trips to New York City.β€’ This year we're going to Colorado on a five-day skiing trip.β€’ Your space trip cost $ 5 but gave you at least $ 100 of pleasure.β€’ Piaf had persuaded him to make the trip.β€’ Hotelier Dermot Walsh organised the trip.β€’ The trip has been hurriedly arranged by a group of pub locals.β€’ The trip to the coast took longer than we expected.β€’ How was your trip?business/school/shopping etc tripβ€’ We're over here on a business trip.β€’ He was on a business trip to California.β€’ Before the week is over, she will make several more shopping trips to put food on the dinner table.β€’ The man who'd followed us on our shopping trip.β€’ She started coming down with it when we were on our business trip, arranging this weekend.β€’ She used to really like those shopping trips to Nordstrom.β€’ Scheduled an out-of-town business trip.β€’ Planning begins even before you venture out for the weekly shopping trip, readers say.
Related topics: Drug culture
triptrip2 ●●○ verb (tripped, tripping) πŸ”Š πŸ”Š 1 fall (also trip up) [intransitive]FALL to hit something with your foot by accident so that you fall or almost fall syn stumble πŸ”Š He tripped and fell.trip over πŸ”Š Clary tripped over a cable and broke his foot.trip on πŸ”Š He tripped on the bottom step.2 make somebody fall (also trip up) [transitive]FALL to make someone fall by putting your foot in front of them when they are moving πŸ”Š Baggio was tripped inside the penalty area.3 switch on [transitive] to switch on a piece of electrical equipment by accident πŸ”Š An intruder had tripped the alarm.4 walk/dance [intransitive always + adverb/preposition] literaryWALK to walk, run, or dance with quick light steps πŸ”Š a little girl tripping down the lane5 β†’ trip off the tongue6 drug (also trip out) [intransitive] informalMDD to experience the mental effects of a drug such as LSD πŸ”Š They must have been tripping.7 β†’ trip the light fantastic β†’ trip up
β†’ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
tripβ€’ I didn't push him - he tripped.β€’ One of the runners claimed she had been tripped.β€’ She trips and falls down on to the pallet.β€’ One boy tripped and fell into the water.β€’ He stumbled forward, and tripped, and fell.β€’ A moment later she trips and slides down the hill.β€’ I tripped as I got out of the car.β€’ Gretzky was tripped by O'Donnell near the goal.β€’ One man tripped me up and the other one grabbed my handbag.β€’ Her medical problems began when she tripped on a rug and broke her hip.β€’ The stammering policeman spun around, tripped on the rusty pot, and all but crashed to the ground.β€’ Once the beast can walk on a flat smooth floor without tripping, other behaviors can be added to improve the walk.β€’ Pick up that box -- someone might trip over it.β€’ She'd had quite a lot to drink and kept tripping over.β€’ The pensioner was so angry, he tripped up the mugger with his walking stick and grabbed the book back.tripped and fellβ€’ The little Hoflin, who had her speciality showpiece in Act Two, did it very badly and finally tripped and fell.β€’ I've got a bad migraine, I tripped and fell and cut my arm.β€’ A fall in the kitchen While working in her kitchen, a woman tripped and fell catching her face on a cupboard.β€’ Zorro leaped through an enormous fountain, but tripped and fell face first into the water.β€’ Madra tripped and fell headlong in the leaf mould, and in an instant their pursuers were upon her.β€’ He tripped and fell into thick bush.β€’ He was jumping already so we just tripped and fell on him.β€’ He tripped and fell, scrambled to his feet and sprinted out of reach.
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Verb table
trip
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theytrip
he, she, ittrips
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theytripped
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave tripped
he, she, ithas tripped
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad tripped
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill trip
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have tripped
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam tripping
he, she, itis tripping
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you, we, theyare tripping
Past
I, he, she, itwas tripping
you, we, theywere tripping
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been tripping
he, she, ithas been tripping
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been tripping
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be tripping
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been tripping
> View Less