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Date: 1200-1300
Language: Old French
Origin: troubler, from Vulgar Latin turbulare, from Latin turbidus; TURBID

trouble

2 verb
     
trouble2 [transitive]
1

worry

if a problem troubles you, it makes you feel worried or upset:
There is one thing that's been troubling me.
They have been deeply troubled by the allegations.
His conscience troubled him.
2

inconvenience

formal to say something or ask someone to do something which may use or waste their time or upset them [= bother]:
I promise not to trouble you again.
trouble somebody with something
I don't want to trouble the doctor with it.
I won't trouble you with the details.
3

may I trouble you?/sorry to trouble you

spoken formal used when politely asking someone to do something for you or give you something:
Sorry to trouble you, but could you tell me the way to the station, please?
May I trouble you for the salt?
4

don't trouble yourself

spoken used to politely tell someone not to help you:
Please don't trouble yourself. I can manage.
5

not trouble to do something

to not do something because it needs too much effort [= not bother to do something]:
They never troubled to ask me what I would like.
Luke didn't trouble to hide his disgust.
! It is much more usual to use bother: Don't bother to call first - just come over. | I didn't bother to change all the sheets.
6

health problem

if a medical problem troubles you, it causes you pain or problems:
He is still being troubled by an ankle injury.
7

cause problems

to cause someone problems or difficulties:
They look good enough to trouble most teams in the competition.

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