English version

uncharacteristic

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishuncharacteristicun‧char‧ac‧ter‧is‧tic /ʌnˌkærətəˈrɪstɪk◂/ adjective  TYPICALnot typical of someone or something and therefore surprisinguncharacteristic of It’s uncharacteristic of her to be late.uncharacteristically /-kli/ adverb He was uncharacteristically quiet.
Examples from the Corpus
uncharacteristicWhatever it was, it was uncharacteristic.It was summer and despite the uncharacteristic chill in the air, the tourists were swarming the beaches.It was summer and despite the uncharacteristic chill in the air, the tourists were swarming the beaches.Not only is he facing an uncertain future, he is being forced to behave in an uncharacteristic fashion every day.For a couple of minutes she gave in to another uncharacteristic fit of temper.With uncharacteristic modesty, Will explained his contribution to the development of the film medium.It was just that it was so uncharacteristic of her.Was the news of financial reversal enough to explain his uncharacteristic outburst?But there was a brief and uncharacteristic pause before he continued.When the polls closed on election night, Democratic headquarters had an uncharacteristic tension.uncharacteristic ofIt's uncharacteristic of Margaret to get so angry.
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