English version

upset

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishupsetup‧set1 /ˌʌpˈset◂/ ●●● S2 adjective  1 [not before noun]UPSET unhappy and worried because something unpleasant or disappointing has happenedupset by/about/at etc She was deeply upset about the way her father treated her.upset that Debbie was upset that he didn’t spend more time with her.2 be upset with somebody3 upset stomachTHESAURUSupset [not before noun] unhappy and worried because something unpleasant or disappointing has happenedMiss Hurley is too upset to speak to anyone at the moment.She’s still deeply upset about her uncle’s death.He’s upset that he didn’t get an invitation to their wedding.hurt upset and shocked because someone has been unkind to you, especially someone that you trusted and thought was a friendBill felt deeply hurt when he realized she had lied to him.Gretta was really hurt that none of her friends came to visit her in the hospital.Jackson was said to be ‘deeply hurt’ by the newspaper reports about him.He had a hurt expression on his face.distressed very upsetPriests have been counselling distressed relatives of the victims.She was visibly distressed after hearing of her husband’s accident.Matilda was too distressed to speak.distraught written so upset and worried that you are unable to do normal things, and nothing can make you feel calmBenson was so distraught over the breakup of his marriage that he felt like committing suicide.The distraught parents of the missing baby have made a public appeal for her return.in a (terrible) state British English informal so upset that you cannot stop cryingShe called me one night in a terrible state, saying she wanted to die.I could see that she was in a bit of a state.be worked up informal to be very upset or angry, so that you think things are worse than they really areI was too worked up to sleep.It’s not worth getting worked up about. Anyone can make a mistake.
Examples from the Corpus
upsetOrton wrote to Williams hoping he wasn't too upset.She had already started to retreat into eating when she felt upset.Snowy said she didn't mind, but Jane still felt upset.The monster after committing this atrocity felt upset.We'd better not tell Mum about what's happened. She'll only get upset.Liz is very upset about her uncle's death.She's still upset about her uncle's death.Now Snyde's about to take over the control of copying and the Copy Master is upset about it.Don't be upset. I'm sure she didn't mean to be unkind.The organizers were upset that so few people visited the exhibition."What's the matter with Rod?" "I think he's still upset that we forgot his birthday."Miss Hurley is too upset to speak to anyone at the moment.Evidence of identification was given by the college chaplain who said he was too upset to talk about the death.The children were very upset when we told them that we wouldn't be going to Disneyland.upset thatThe proposed law would upset that balance in favor of property owners.He was upset that Barclays tried to check his credit-standing without telling him.The delay made Ledyard so upset that he became sick to his stomach.She is upset that her current doctor won't fill out the forms for her referral until he knows her better.I had learned that a dear friend was dying and was so upset that I was having trouble sleeping.Marcy was upset that she was invited.He seemed genuinely upset that the boy had been killed.The 5,000 mostly Catholic villagers are upset that the changes they have made are not appreciated.I am upset that these pointless matters turn our conversations negative.
upsetup‧set2 /ʌpˈset/ ●●● S2 verb (past tense and past participle upset, present participle upsetting) [transitive]  1 make somebody unhappyUPSET to make someone feel unhappy or worried Don’t do anything that would upset him.it upsets somebody that/when/to do It upsets me to see you cry.2 change somethingDISTURB to change a plan or situation in a way that causes problems The chemicals upset the balance of the environment.3 make something fallFALL to push something over without intending to He upset a bowl of soup.4 defeat to defeat an opponent who is considered to be much better than you Jones upset the 40th-ranked American, Cunningham.5 upset the apple cart6 upset your stomachupsetting adjective→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
upsetFootball fans and coaches were outraged that their schedules were being upset.One of the kids upset a bottle of water on the table.France upset Brazil in the World Cup final.Positions might have been changed and the precarious political balance upset by any intensification of the spiritual pollution campaign.Her father died when she was ten, and it still upsets her to think about it.The idea of having to change school seemed to upset him more than we thought it would."Why's he crying?" "I don't know - something must have upset him."What upsets me most is the way she lied to me.It used to upset me - really, you have no idea.It still upsets me to think about my parents' divorce.She was careful not to upset the bottle of nail polish on the bed.Recent bank failures threaten to upset the entire world economy.The closing of the plant threatens to upset the local economy.Rowan said this latest outbreak of violence could upset the peace talks.Young children don't like anything which upsets their daily routine.I'm sorry if I upset you - I didn't mean to.I'm sorry - I didn't mean to upset you.Try not to upset your father. He's had a hard day.upset the balance ofSurprisingly, the widespread mortality of the plague of 1349 did not completely upset the balance of power between lord and peasant.Critics say the law upsets the balance of power by delegating legislative authority to the executive branch.The chemicals upset the balance of the environment and killed not only the whitefly but also other wildlife including the bumble bee.Any discovery which later may threaten it is rejected by one's mental defences and could upset the balance of the mind.
upsetup‧set3 /ˈʌpset/ noun  1 [countable, uncountable]SAD/UNHAPPY worry and unhappiness caused by an unexpected problem If you are the victim of a burglary, the emotional upset can affect you for a long time.2 [countable]BEAT/DEFEAT when a person or team defeats an opponent who is considered to be much better than them There was a major upset when the young skater took the gold medal.see thesaurus at victory3 stomach upset
Examples from the Corpus
upsetStephanie White led Purdue to an upset over No. 4-ranked Stanford.It is possible that these symptoms are due to hormonal upsets, caused by anti-bodies affecting the ovaries.And two years later, he skippered the side when they lost ingloriously to Sheffield Eagles in a monumental upset.But, like all professionals, Fisher is prone to the odd upset.The trivial upsets of daily living assume importance but the big tragedies they take in their stride.
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Verb table
upset
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyupset
he, she, itupsets
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyupset
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave upset
he, she, ithas upset
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad upset
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill upset
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have upset
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam upsetting
he, she, itis upsetting
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you, we, theyare upsetting
Past
I, he, she, itwas upsetting
you, we, theywere upsetting
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been upsetting
he, she, ithas been upsetting
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been upsetting
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be upsetting
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been upsetting
> View Less