English version

verbal

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Grammar
verbalverb‧al1 /ˈvɜːbəl $ ˈvɜːr-/ ●●○ adjective  1 SPEAK A LANGUAGEspoken rather than writtenverbal agreement/instructions etc2 WORD, PHRASE, OR SENTENCErelating to words or using words verbal skills verbal abuse (=cruel words) from other kids on the street3 SLGrelating to a verb verbal nounsverbally adverb Her boss failed to stop the other workers from verbally abusing her.
Examples from the Corpus
verbalverbal abuseWe had a verbal agreement but no written contract.This was an untruth-there had been a clear verbal agreement that he would be reimbursed for all his costs.Federal authorities gave Alascom verbal approval to begin the project.One month after the tests, his teacher wrote the following entry: Harold has become quite verbal but otherwise progressed little.Some very verbal children may be overreactive to noise and certain types of touch and visual input.The physical part made up for the shallowness of verbal communication.verbal communicationYour prime objective should assist you in coming to terms with the most limiting aspect of verbal presentations.And he held the elements of mental propositions to be ideas, just as those of verbal propositions are words.A verbal report will usually be enough.verbal skillNormally a language is developed by human beings from guttural sounds that eventually become verbal symbols for objects and actions.verbal agreement/instructions etcIt's only a verbal agreement.Photographs of children carrying out each step provide visual reinforcement of the verbal instructions.The conference sponsors claimed that there was never even a verbal agreement, and refused to pay.Your verbal agreement is less important to the child than your interest in how he is feeling.The learner acts appropriately on receiving verbal instructions or requests.This was an untruth-there had been a clear verbal agreement that he would be reimbursed for all his costs.They are non-verbal tests, though there are verbal instructions which had to be translated into sign for deaf participants.verbal abuseA four-letter word was among his offerings and the official had no alternative but to give him a warning for verbal abuse.Some 30 % of exclusions were for bullying, and a further 14.9 % for verbal abuse.There were the violent outbursts, way out of proportion to any wrong done, and constant verbal abuse.They had descended to their usual shouting of verbal abuse.A solid majority shows strong correlation with disrespectful behavior, verbal abuse and physical aggression.I was scared of verbal abuse before, when I was bigger; now it's great to feel invisible.The effects of verbal abuse can be shattering.Even though he never physically abused me, the verbal abuse was frightening.
verbalverbal2 noun  1 [countable] technical a word that has been formed from a verb, for example a gerund, infinitive, or participle2 [uncountable] relating to criticism, complaints, or an attack that you express in speech Maria was getting loads of verbal from her staff.
Examples from the Corpus
verbalThe touch judges come in for some even more serious verbals.
From Longman Business Dictionaryverbalverb‧al /ˈvɜːbəlˈvɜːr-/ adjective a verbal contract, agreement etc is one that is spoken rather than writtenThe bank manager gaveverbal assurances of the security of the investments.
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