English version

vet

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishvetvet1 /vet/ ●●○ S3 noun [countable]  1 MNHBA (also veterinary surgeon British English formal) someone who is trained to give medical care and treatment to sick animals syn veterinarian American Englishsee thesaurus at doctor2 American English informal a veteran(1) a Vietnam vet
Examples from the Corpus
vetHe announced the results of a survey of 400 vets working in 600 slaughterhouses which found the average hourly rate was £25.70.Gina has wanted to be a veterinarian since she was a little girl.Holly Thomas has wanted to be a vet since she was four years old.I will send for a vet tomorrow.But no, this chap isn't a vet.Mind you, I expect they're already fixed up with a vet.But vets say the public is unaware of just how dangerous the virus can be.Some techniques used in marketing to physicians work especially well on vets.Could you call the vet and ask him to come to the farm? I'd like him to have a look at one of the horses.And still the vet did not come.Jane's taking her kitten to the vet on Friday.
vetvet2 verb (vetted, vetting) [transitive]  1 British EnglishEXAMINE to check someone’s past activities, relationships etc in order to make sure that person is suitable for a particular job, especially an important one All candidates are carefully vetted by Central Office.2 EXAMINEto check a report, speech etc carefully to make sure it is acceptable The author vets every script for the new TV series.→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
vetThe Home Office says all staff will be strictly vetted.It called on ministers to set up a firearms control board which would vet all applicants before issuing a guns licence.Tanner had already been vetted and confirmed for his job at the CIA.High schools are paid for by the prefecture, but their curriculum is vetted by the capital.This reveals that more than 70 investment schemes vet companies on ethical and/or environmental grounds.He vets every script and is checking-out scripts for the new series at the moment.No, but there's a careful vetting procedure-psychometric tests and interviews, and informal references are checked.I also spent about three months vetting requests for enquiries.Hughes called on ministers to vet the new gospel play for him.
From Longman Business Dictionaryvetvet /vet/ verb (vetted, vetting) [transitive] British EnglishHUMAN RESOURCES to examine someone’s previous jobs and activities to find out whether they are suitable to do a job, especially one that involves dealing with secret informationThe key requirement is to vet people for the most senior posts.After passing the selection board, candidates are vetted by one of the organization’s professionals.vetting noun [uncountable]The company said standardvetting procedures were carried out.→ See Verb table
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Verb table
vet
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyvet
he, she, itvets
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyvetted
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave vetted
he, she, ithas vetted
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad vetted
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill vet
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have vetted
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam vetting
he, she, itis vetting
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you, we, theyare vetting
Past
I, he, she, itwas vetting
you, we, theywere vetting
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been vetting
he, she, ithas been vetting
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been vetting
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be vetting
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been vetting
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