Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1200-1300
Language: Old North French
Origin: waster, from Latin vastare; DEVASTATE

waste

2 verb
     
waste2 S2 W3 [transitive]
1

not use sensibly

to use more money, time, energy etc than is useful or sensible:
Leaving the heating on all the time wastes electricity.
waste something on somebody/something
Don't waste your money on that junk!
2

not use fully

[usually passive] to not make full use of someone or something:
Hannah's wasted in that clerical job.
His talents were being wasted as a lawyer.
3

be wasted on somebody

if something is wasted on someone, they do not understand how good or useful it is:
Her good advice was wasted on the children.
4

waste your breath

spoken to say something that has no effect:
Don't try to reason with Paul - you're wasting your breath.
5

waste no time (in) doing something

to do something as quickly as you can because it will help you:
He wasted no time in introducing himself.
6

waste not, want not

spoken used to say that if you use what you have carefully, you will still have some of it if you need it later
7

harm somebody

informal American English to kill someone, severely injure them, or defeat them

waste away

phrasal verb
MI to gradually become thinner and weaker, usually because you are ill

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