English version

weaken

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Currencies
weakenweak‧en /ˈwiːkən/ ●●○ verb [intransitive, transitive]  1 POWERto make someone or something less powerful or less important, or to become less powerful opp strengthen Over the last two years the president’s position has weakened. Changes in policy have weakened the power of the trade unions. The absence of this witness has weakened the case against the accused.2 WEAKto make someone lose their physical strength, or to become physically weak Julia was weakened by her long illness.3 PERSUADEto make someone less determined, or to become less determined Such policies weaken the resolve of potential troublemakers. When she begged him to let her stay, he weakened.4 TECTBCto make a building, structure etc less strong, or to become less strong The earthquake in Cairo weakened a number of structures.5 PECBFSif a particular country’s money or a company’s share prices weaken, or if they are weakened, their value is reducedweaken against The pound has weakened against the dollar.
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Examples from the Corpus
weakenIt seems, too, that traditional values that prescribe a life of domesticity are weakening.The soldiers' morale was beginning to weaken.The city's defences had been weakened by enemy shelling.Hartman was weakened by flu, but still managed to play.That is one reason so many Republicans want him to remain in place even in a weakened condition.By 1945, the country's power was weakening considerably.Her long illness has weakened her so much that she has difficulty walking.Trying to please everyone inevitably leads to compromise, and that in turn weakens individual expression.Birthday shows us that weakening is inevitable, but not always fatal.It is a manner of speech now increasingly rare in the world, faded and ever weakening like a lost radio signal.By launching the new forum Mr Heseltine is getting his own back on the now weakened Mr Lamont.Pleasure, a rarity at any rate, only serves to weaken one; what one really needs is stamina and discipline.Inside the house the heat weakened only slightly.Some parents are worried that public education weakens the family's influence.The explosion severely weakened the foundations of the house.
From Longman Business Dictionaryweakenweak‧en /ˈwiːkən/ verb1[intransitive, transitive]FINANCE if investments, prices, currencies etc weaken, or something weakens them, they begin to fall in valueA combination of low US interest rates and a rising Euro will weaken the dollar.Work stoppages will cause an alreadyweakening economy to slow further.London shares weakened, while Frankfurt stocks finished strong.2[transitive] to make something less powerful, successful, or profitableFurther weakened by the recession, the airline filed for bankruptcy.Many agencies fear that revealing the use of subcontractors may weaken their reputations as full-service shops.→ See Verb table
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Verb table
weaken
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyweaken
he, she, itweakens
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyweakened
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave weakened
he, she, ithas weakened
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad weakened
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill weaken
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have weakened
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam weakening
he, she, itis weakening
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you, we, theyare weakening
Past
I, he, she, itwas weakening
you, we, theywere weakening
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been weakening
he, she, ithas been weakening
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been weakening
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be weakening
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been weakening
> View Less