Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Language: Old English
Origin: wegan 'to move, carry, weigh'

weigh

verb
     
weigh S3
1

be a particular weight

[linking verb] to have a particular weight:
The young birds weigh only a few grams.
Do you know how much it weighs?
What (=how much) do you weigh?
The box was full of books and weighed a ton (=was very heavy).
2

measure weight

[transitive] to use a machine to discover how much something or someone weighs:
He weighed some potatoes on the scales.
weigh yourself
Have you weighed yourself lately?
3

consider/compare

also weigh up [transitive] to consider something carefully so that you can make a decision about it:
It is my job to weigh the evidence.
weigh something against something
We have to weigh the benefits of the scheme against the costs.
4

influence

[intransitive always + adverb/preposition] formal to influence someone's opinion and the decision that they make
weigh against
This unfortunate experience will weigh heavily against further investment in the area.
weigh in somebody/something's favour
These facts will weigh in your favour.
weigh with
Her evidence weighed strongly with the judge.
5

weigh your words

to think very carefully about what you say because you do not want to say the wrong thing:
He was weighing his words carefully.
6

weigh anchor

TTW to raise an anchor and sail away

weigh somebody ↔ down

phrasal verb
1 if something weighs you down, it is heavy and difficult to carry
be weighed down with something
Sally was weighed down with shopping bags.
2 if a problem weighs you down, it makes you feel worried and upset
be weighed down by/with something
He felt weighed down by his responsibilities.
a family weighed down with grief

weigh in

phrasal verb
1DSHDSO to have your weight measured before taking part in a competition
weigh in at
Higgins weighed in at just over 100 kilos.
weigh-in
2 informal to join in an argument or fight
weigh in with
The chairman then weighed in with his views.

weigh on somebody/something

phrasal verb
to make someone feel worried and upset:
The desire for peace will weigh heavily on the negotiators.
I'm sure there's something weighing on his mind.
The burden of responsibility weighed heavily on his shoulders.

weigh something ↔ out

phrasal verb
TM to measure an amount of something by weighing it:
She weighed out half a kilo of rice.

weigh somebody/something ↔ up

phrasal verb
1 to consider something carefully so that you can make a decision about it:
We're still weighing up the pros and cons (=the advantages and disadvantages) of the two options.
2 to watch someone and listen to them carefully so that you can form an opinion about what they are like:
I could see that he was weighing me up.

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