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wind

2 verb
     
wind2 past tense and past participle wound
1 [transitive always + adverb/preposition] to turn or twist something several times around something else
wind something around/round something
The hair is divided into sections and wound around heated rods.
2 [transitive] also wind up to turn part of a machine around several times, in order to make it move or start working:
Did you remember to wind the clock?
3 [intransitive always + adverb/preposition] if a road, river etc winds somewhere, it has many smooth bends and is usually very long
wind (its way) through/along etc something
Highway 99 winds its way along the coast.
a winding path
4 [transitive] to make a tape move in a machine
wind something forward/back
Can you wind the video back a little way - I want to see that bit again.
! Do not confuse with the noun wind, which has a different pronunciation. rewind
wind noun [countable]

wind down

phrasal verb
1

wind something ↔ down

to gradually reduce the work of a business or organization so that it can be closed down completely
2 to rest and relax after a lot of hard work or excitement:
I find it difficult to wind down after a day at work.
3

wind something ↔ down

British English to make something, especially a car window, move down by turning a handle or pressing a button

wind up

phrasal verb
1 to bring an activity, meeting etc to an end:
OK, just to wind up, could I summarize what we've decided?
wind something ↔ up
It's time to wind things up - I have a plane to catch.
2

wind something ↔ up

to close down a company or organization:
Our operations in Jamaica are being wound up.
3 [linking verb] informal to be in an unpleasant situation or place after a lot has happened [= end up]
wind up in/at/with etc
You know you're going to wind up in court over this.
wind up doing something
I wound up wishing I'd never come.
4

wind somebody ↔ up

British English to deliberately say or do something that will annoy or worry someone, as a joke [↪ tease]:
They're only winding you up.
wound up
5

wind something ↔ up

to turn part of a machine around several times, in order to make it move or start working
6

wind something ↔ up

British English to make something, especially a car window, move up by turning a handle or pressing a button:
Could you wind the window up, please?

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