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Language: Old English
Origin: gese

yes

1 adverb
     
yes1 S1 W1 spoken
1

answer to question/statement

a) used as an answer to say that something is true or that you agree [≠ no]:
'Is that real gold?' 'Yes.'
'It was a great show.' 'Yes, it was.'
b) used as an answer to a question or statement containing a negative, to say that the opposite is true:
'Sarah isn't very intelligent, is she?' 'Yes, she is (=in fact, she is intelligent)!'
'There isn't any cereal left.' 'Yes, there is - it's in the cupboard.'
2

answer to offer/invitation

used as an answer to say that you want something or want to do something [≠ no]:
'Would you like a sandwich?' ' Yes, please.'
'Would you like to come with us?' 'Yes, I'd love to.'
3

answer to request

used as an answer to say that you will do something, or that someone may do or have something [≠ no]:
'Can I have a glass of water?' 'Yes, of course.'
He proposed to me and I said yes.
4

yes, but ...

used to show that you agree with what someone has said, but there is another fact to consider:
'There are still a lot of problems with Jeff's proposal.' 'Yes, but it's the best one we have.'
5

ready to listen/talk

used to show that you have heard someone or are ready to speak to someone:
'Mike?' 'Yes?'
Yes sir, how can I help you?
6

listening

used to show that you are listening to someone and want them to continue:
'And so I tried phoning him ...' 'Yes ...'
7

excited/happy

used to show that you are very excited or happy about something:
Yes! Rivaldo's scored again!
8

oh yes

a) used to show that you do not believe what someone is saying:
'There's nothing going on between me and Jane. We're just good friends.' 'Oh yes?'
b) used to show that you have remembered something:
Where's my umbrella? Oh yes - I left it in the car.
9

emphasis

used to emphasize that you mean what you have just said, even though it is surprising:
It took ten years - yes, ten whole years - to complete.
Yes, you heard me correctly - I said 1921.
10

yes, yes

used to show annoyance when someone is talking to you and you do not want to listen:
'And don't forget to lock the door!' 'Yes, yes, OK.'
11

yes and no

used to show that there is not one clear answer to a question:
'Were you surprised?' 'Well, yes and no. I knew they were planning something, but I wasn't sure what.'

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