English version

yield

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Transport
yieldyield1 /jiːld/ ●●○ verb  1 result [transitive]RESULT to produce a result, answer, or piece of information Our research has only recently begun to yield important results.2 crops/profits [transitive]MAKE to produce crops, profits etc Each of these oilfields could yield billions of barrels of oil. The tourist industry yielded an estimated $2.25 billion for the state last year. These investments should yield a reasonable return.high-yielding/low-yielding high-yielding cropsRegisterIn everyday English, people usually say that something produces a result, a profit etc rather than yields it:Each cow produces almost 20 litres of milk a day.3 agree unwillingly [intransitive, transitive]AGREE to allow yourself to be forced or persuaded to do something or stop having something The military has promised to yield power.yield to The hijackers refuse to yield to demands to release the passengers. Further action may be necessary if the leaders do not yield to diplomatic pressure. Finally she yielded to temptation and helped herself to a large slice of cake.RegisterIn everyday English, people usually say someone gives in to pressures, demands etc rather than yields to them:I very much doubt the boss will give in to her demands.4 traffic [intransitive] American EnglishTT to allow other traffic on a bigger road to go first syn give way British Englishyield to Yield to traffic on the left.5 move/bend/break [intransitive]MOVE/CHANGE POSITION to move, bend, or break because of physical force or pressure syn give Ideally, the surface should yield slightly under pressure.6 give up fighting [intransitive] literaryLOSE A GAME, COMPETITION, OR WAR to stop fighting and accept defeat syn surrender yield to something yield something ↔ up
→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
yieldBonds due 2026 yield 5. 65 %.But so urgent was getting the planer working that this time Taylor yielded.A search of Mann's home yielded a pair of bloody gloves.He yielded as before, and very soon the two wicked women arrived, with their plot carefully worked out.Each of these fields could yield billions of barrels of oil.Different standards of significance will naturally yield different theories - sets of laws relating significant descriptions.Government securities have traditionally yielded less than stocks.Teaching well takes time and often yields little tangible reward.To the persistent seeker the Bible yields more and more of its riches.The military has promised to yield power after legislators draw up a new constitution.yield ... resultsBringing these out in the open and subjecting them to scrutiny and analysis will yield fruitful results.Hoomey could bloody well suffer, if it yielded results.In contemporary matters, Shoumatoff yields better results.It is also far more likely than a reactive search to yield positive results.The investigation, he concluded without surprise, yielded negative results.This hypothesis has yielded contradictory results.A frequently cited study conducted in Los Angeles yielded some interesting results concerning noise and how it disturbs sleep.This technique has yielded widely inconsistent results, however, and is now rarely performed.yield ... returnCasting wider for other presidential candidates does not yield a healthy return.Noise/horror strikes me as a limited form of self-destruction, that can only yield diminishing returns.Partly for that reason, too many projects yield poor returns.The government and housing divisions were said to have yielded the lowest returns and action is promised to boost their performance.Sport can possess the characteristic of a capital good, one that yields a return as part of a market production process.Y may be sold short and the proceeds invested in X yielding a riskless return for no investment.It yields these returns mainly by targeting and serving profitable customers.A car is highly illiquid, but yields a high return to the owner.yield toWilson refused to yield to requests to raise salaries.Yield to traffic on the right.
yieldyield2 ●○○ noun [countable]  AMOUNTthe amount of profits, crops etc that something produces The average milk yield per cow has doubled.high/low yield Shareholders are expecting a higher yield this year.yield of a yield of over six percentsee thesaurus at amount
Examples from the Corpus
yielda 22% fall in this year's cotton yieldSo returns will be more stable on a share with a higher dividend yield, other things being equal.However, the situation may change if inflation rises; under those circumstances fixed yields become unattractive. 2.investments with high yieldsThe implied yield was 6. 15 percent a week ago.We have calculated the probable yield from this investment at around 17%.Chemical reactions which do not produce quantitative yields are sometimes called non-stoichiometric processes.The running yield is currently 8.24 per cent, with a redemption yield of 6.87 per cent.After many hours the yield still may not be acceptable.If you invest the money now, the yield after only twelve months will be $3160.high/low yieldSoviero joined Fidelity in 1989 as a high yield analyst.Several predicted that they will be reap higher yields and profits while saving their soil.These securities are short-term, highly liquid securities with reasonably high yields.Key questions the new trials aim to answer are: Should low yielding areas get more?Should high yielding areas get less?The critical handicap under which she laboured, however, appears to have been the low yield of the land.But for those with guts, some of the highest yields around can be found here -- and even an occasional windfall.These high yields can be tempting but dangerous.
From Longman Business Dictionaryyieldyield1 /jiːld/ noun1[countable, uncountable]FINANCE the amount of money that you get from an investment, especially bondsinvestments with high yieldsMany investors are buying stocks because of low yields in other securities. bond yield current yield dividend yield earnings yield effective yield equity yield gilt yields gross yield initial yield maturity yield net yield nominal yield prospective yield redemption yield running yield true yield2[countable, uncountable]FARMING the amount of something that is produced, such as cropsFarmers who practise intensive farming are aiming for maximum yields for minimum cost.3[countable, uncountable]COMMERCE the average amount of money that an AIRLINE gets from each of its passengers for each mile that they fly or by a hotel from each of its guests for each night they stayThe airline’s passenger revenue yield rose from 12.8 cents to 12.95 cents.Officials have said their pricing strategy, known as yield management, is merely a sophisticated approach to supply and demand. see also load factoryieldyield2 verb1[transitive] to produce income or profitsMining shares often yield a high level of return.2[transitive] to produce a product, crop etcThese rice fields now yield 145,000 tons a year.3[transitive] to produce a result, answer, or a piece of informationThe discussions failed to yield any useful results.Writing to the agents yielded no reply.→ See Verb table
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Verb table
yield
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyyield
he, she, ityields
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyyielded
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave yielded
he, she, ithas yielded
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad yielded
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill yield
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have yielded
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam yielding
he, she, itis yielding
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you, we, theyare yielding
Past
I, he, she, itwas yielding
you, we, theywere yielding
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been yielding
he, she, ithas been yielding
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been yielding
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be yielding
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been yielding
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